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Lauren Reeves

Media Production

Unit 9 Evaluation Draft

Unit 9 Evaluation

 

What skills (at least three) do you think have helped your writing in this unit? Why and how?

  • There are several skills I believe have helped my writing in this unit. The first being crafting. The use of crafting in sentences is essential to a writer as it allows you to create more gripping sentences that grab your readers’ attention. Crafting

Another skill I believe has helped my writing is the use of ‘show, not tell.’ This is the writing style of allowing your reader to visualise what you write, instead of telling them the details. You allow the reader to put the pieces together themselves instead of spoon-feeding them. It is also a lot easier and more pleasant to read than it is to read a piece that just tells the reader everything. ‘Bill went upstairs. Bill sat down. Bill ate cereal’ is just poorly written.

Another skill that has helped my writing is the ability to portray genres through different mediums. This has really improved my writing as I have been able to explore multiple mediums such as scripts, documentaries, radio plays and many others. It has also opened up my mind to new writing opportunities.

 

 

Which exercises have been the most useful to you and your writing and your understanding of how to develop your work (crafting)?

  • One of the most useful exercises we have done was on the topic of ‘Show, not tell.’ We were given a paragraph to rewrite in the style of showing and not telling. We then were given sentences to rewrite, showing the reader what was happening instead of telling them. I found this exercise to be really helpful as I was able to learn more about the concept as well as writing my own pieces using what I’d learnt.

Another exercise I felt really benefitted me was the work we did on theatre scripts. We were given two random characters, a setting and an object, and from that we were to create a script. I found this exercise to be really interesting as it opened up my creativity to a new medium. It was also a really interesting experience to work with characters created by someone else.

 

How does the writing in each medium/form compare and how do they differ? Reflect back on the characteristics and whether you recognise this in your own writing?

  • To me, my two chosen formats contrast in a complimentary way. My news pieces hands out the facts and tells a story whereas my memoir is a personal look at the issue at hand. Whilst the two formats are different, they work well together to explain all sides of a topic.

In my news article, I told the story of Bijan Ebrahimi. I felt that his story would provoke a strong emotional response from the reader. In my memoir, I also recounted two encounters I’d had. Whilst both featured myself looking on at racism, each featured a different character. One being the victim and the other being the racist. I felt that these two views worked well together as they allowed the reader to gain insight into the minds of both parties.

Reflect on the process of writing: the main characters or human interest in the story and how their needs drive the action and the plot/story; the themes or subject and how it was structured. Checking, proofreading plus crafting editing your work

  • When writing my pieces, I constantly reminded myself what I was writing about as I didn’t want to go off topic. For my news feature, I aimed to add an emotional pull without coming across as too attached. Throughout my article, the main focus was the story of Bijan Ebrahimi and how he was treated. I wanted to really open people’s eyes to this issue as many turn a blind eye. I believe that his story was what was needed to get the point across.

With the memoir, I wrote on a much more personal level. I drew from personal experiences to create this piece. At first, I was unsure on how to write a memoir, however, I studied other memoirs and gathered an idea. I took from conversations I’d had and people I’d met to make this piece. I hit a roadblock however after I wrote Tatenda’s story. That was until the recent conversation between my Dad and me. After said conversation, I went upstairs and began writing.

Throughout the writing process for both pieces, I constantly went back to check the spelling and to edit what I had written, recrafting my sentences. However, there were a few mistakes that I didn’t catch but luckily, my Tutor did, resulting in my finished work.

My Tutor and I discussed both of my pieces and I now believe that my memoir could be taken a lot further. I intend on writing more and perhaps turning it into a novella or an official memoir. I am keeping this idea in my mind for my Final Project of the year and also for future works, maybe in university or just as a side project.

 

 

Crafting:

 

In my pieces, I believe that my word choice has the right meaning and puts across my intended message. I chose words that would set the tone and suit the style. As I was writing pieces about a serious topic, I did try to inject some humour to lighten the pieces a bit without taking away from the seriousness of the subject. I wrote both pieces with intent to have an impact on the reader, I structured sentences to have varying lengths to do this.

I changed the structure of my article several times before deciding to open with Ebrahimi’s story as I felt it would grab the attention of the reader and draw them in. It has a dramatic opening which will pack a punch with the reader.

I have identified the characteristics of both mediums and written both pieces to relate to the target audience.

 

From reading my own work:

 

Reading my work now, as a reader instead of the author, I can see my development. When I compare my finished pieces to the first drafts, I can see a big change. I have structured the pieces differently than before and have incorporated crafting into the process more.

My finished work stays true to my original ideas whilst also having a new twist.

Looking back at my work, I have tweaked a few sentences, recrafting them to fit better with the tone. Other than that, my work has remained the same. Looking at my work as a reader after I have finished writing is a really beneficial practise and it is something I will continue from now on with my future works.

 

My work has been influenced by two specific memoirs. The first being ‘Coreyography: A Memoir’ by Corey Feldman, in which the American actor retells the story of his career and the abuse he suffered. I found this memoir to be really heart wrenching and the writing style is really immersive. I tried to replicate this in my work by creating a tone that will reach the audience.

Another memoir I was inspired by was ‘A Mother’s Reckoning’ by Sue Klebold. This is also a very personal piece as the author is the Mother of one of the Columbine shooters. Her writing connects with the audience on a personal, heartfelt level and you can really feel the tension build as the book goes on. I tried to replicate this in my own work by using different sentence lengths to create tension and add to the feel of the piece. I also used the crafting skill frequently to ensure I was writing in my intended style.

 

I chose the medium of a memoir as I felt it was a very personal writing form. I believed I could best tell my story through this form and reach the audience on a personal level. I have also read a lot of memoirs in my free time and I feel that that influenced my decision.

I chose to write a news feature as I felt that it would reveal the other side of the coin regarding racism. I felt that this medium was very different to a memoir and I wanted to cover all angles of this issue. I also liked the versatility of news features as you can add your opinion as well as stating the facts. A news article is a lot more fact based compared to a memoir which has a lot more of a personal feel.

I originally wanted to write a poem instead of a news feature however, I quickly changed my mind for several reasons. One being that I felt I wouldn’t be able to fully explore the topics of racism and multiculturalism if I chose this medium as the form is quite similar to that of a memoir. I wanted to write from a different view and explore the subject from all angles.

 

Throughout the process of writing, I used multiple skills such as crafting, using syntax, editing, proofreading and using ‘show not tell’ among many more. I believe through this project, I have furthered my skills and gained more experience and understanding of what these skills can do. I also believe that I have developed as a writer as I have explored a new issue and new mediums. Through this project, I have been able to progress as a writer and gain more experience.

 

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Finished Memoir

I remember the first time I encountered racism.

I was on a school trip to the Dover Museum and my class ran into some kids from another school. It was common knowledge that if you saw kids from another school, you had to establish dominance. It began with glares but quickly escalated when the teacher’s backs were turned. I was looking at the toys in the gift shop when I first heard the ‘n-word.’ Being only nine at the time and rather naïve to the world around me, I looked over at my classmates. But I knew it was bad word by the silence that quickly engulfed my classmates, all of them looking to our friend Tatenda who had moved to England from Kenya the previous year. A few of the kids from the other school looked quite taken aback whilst the rest looked just as confused as me. With tear filled eyes, Tatenda quickly turned her back to them and ran to the loos. It was the first time I had ever seen her not smiling. Whilst she was still getting a grasp on the English language, she seemed to understand that word. Even though I didn’t. She didn’t smile for the rest of the day.

I saw her at Christmas when she came home from University for the holidays. She’s 19 now, studying to become a lawyer. She was already nursing her second mug of black coffee the morning I saw her. I need it for finals, she had said with a tired smile.

When I told her that I was writing this piece, I asked if she remembered that day in Dover. She nodded, shocked that I remembered. It was the first time that I really felt different, I guess?

She spoke about how it had actually been the least offensive racist encounter she had ever had. She’s been in this country for ten years now, speaks English flawlessly (better than some native speakers) but still experiences racism. From having people move away from her on public transport to being told to ‘go back to her own country,’ these encounters aren’t uncommon.

We spoke about what skin colour really is. Just the difference in melanin is what creates different skin tones. She finds it ironic and laughable that some people wish for alien contact but can’t get along with their own species.

But on the other side, I stand. I walk around like I’m in a bubble. Because I see racism but it doesn’t affect me. I’ve never felt like an outsider due to my skin colour. I’ve never had racial slurs hurled at me. I only see racism when I look because it isn’t something I encounter daily.

My Dad and I had a conversation recently regarding racism. Honestly, they’re the only real conversations we have. Usually we just mumble occasional words to each other when needed. But the times we actually do have a proper conversation, albeit they are few and far between, one of us always leaves irritated and exasperated.

We had just watched a scene from EastEnders, one in which a white woman was telling an Indian man to ‘go back to his own country,’ even though he had been raised in England and held British citizenship.

I scoffed at the scene, rolling my eyes as I put my headphones in. I forgot about it until later when I had to recount the episode to my Mum. Whilst explaining the scene, my Dad decided to contribute his opinion by stating ‘well they’re stealing our jobs, aren’t they?!’

Cue the pregnant pause.

I heard my Mum sigh a small ‘oh god’ before leaving the room. I don’t blame her, she knew what would happen. It’s like how rats know to flee a sinking ship, it’s the same with Mums. They know when something’s brewing.

I turn to my white, middle aged, working class Father as he returns my gaze expectantly. ‘When has an immigrant ever stolen your job?’

My Dad is a self-employed car cleaner. Been traveling the exciting streets of Kent since 2000.

He responded with the common ‘Romanians and Ghanaians are stealing my customers!’

Whilst I was expecting that response, I wasn’t expecting it to be that specific. I, of course, was quick was point out that this was mainly to do with price and convenience. It’s a lot easier to drive into a car wash and pay £10 than it is to ring up, book an appointment for a months’ time and pay £40.

I then proceeded to point out that most immigrants that worked in Car Washes are victims of exploitation. They are promised a new life abroad which will benefit them and their families but instead, they are conned out of all their money, forced to work for less than peanuts and live in cramped, dire and very illegal conditions.

Just for fun, I decided to add that a majority of doctors, scientists, surgeons and NHS workers in general are foreign. Without them, healthcare would be non-existent.

This continued for another minute or so before my Father said the dread words.

‘Well, all Muslims are terrorists!’

Now, I will be the first to admit that I can be quite a confrontational person. If an issue needs addressing that no one else wishes to talk about, I will. And if I believe someone is morally wrong, I will voice that. I respect people’s opinions until their opinions disrespect other people’s existence.

But this was something else. I didn’t shout. I didn’t scream in disgust. I just basked in my own disgust and genuine amazement that someone could feel that way before I left the room.

I was so caught up in my thoughts that, at first, I didn’t hear him say ‘Lauren I’m joking!’

I just smiled in utter disbelief before turning to him, my voice barely above a whisper and said ‘Tell that to the families in Saudi Arabia and Pakistan that have just lost their children to terrorists.’

With that, I went to bed.

To be honest, I don’t think I’ll ever change my Dad’s mind. And that used to really bother me. It used to break my heart and sometimes it still does. But I know that if I ever have children, I was raise them to accept and respect everyone regardless of factors such as race, religion, sexuality or gender.

I don’t know how I turned out so differently from my Dad. But the most probable reason is the generation gap. We grew up in different times around different people. My Father’s childhood in the 70s contrasts greatly with mine in the noughties. He grew up surrounded by baby boomers who had only just come around to the idea of women having rights whereas I grew up surrounded by multiple ethnicities and acceptance.

For me, nothing has changed since I was a child. But for him, the world he is currently living in is miles away from how it was when he was a child. And to be honest, I understand that it might be hard to accept.

I believe that one thing that we all have in common is what lies beneath. Underneath our blemished skin lies a beating heart, a powerful mind and blood than runs through our veins, keeping us alive. Regardless of our colour, we all bleed the same.

To me, we aren’t born to be prejudice. We don’t arrive in this world and immediately curl our nose up at the foreign doctor. No, prejudice is taught. It is projected onto us as vulnerable children when we are still discovering the world around them. Our still growing minds are tainted with hatred by those who are supposed to love us.

Race doesn’t matter when you’re six feet under.

Race doesn’t matter when all that’s left of you is bones.

Updated Memoir Draft

I remember the first time I encountered racism.

I was on a school trip to the Dover Museum and my class ran into some kids from another school. It was common knowledge that if you saw kids from another school, you had to establish dominance. It began with glares but quickly escalated when the teacher’s backs were turned. I was looking at the toys in the gift shop when I first heard the ‘n-word.’ Being only nine at the time and rather naïve to the world around me, I looked over at my classmates. But I knew it was bad word by the silence that quickly engulfed my classmates, all of them looking to our friend Tatenda who had moved to England from Kenya the previous year. A few of the kids from the other school looked quite taken aback whilst the rest looked just as confused as me. With tear filled eyes, Tatenda quickly turned her back to them and ran to the loos. It was the first time I had ever seen her not smiling. Whilst she was still getting a grasp on the English language, she seemed to understand that word. Even though I didn’t. She didn’t smile for the rest of the day.

I saw her at Christmas when she came home from University for the holidays. She’s 19 now, studying to become a lawyer. She was already nursing her second mug of black coffee the morning I saw her. I need it for finals, she had said with a tired smile.

When I told her that I was writing this piece, I asked if she remembered that day in Dover. She nodded, shocked that I remembered. It was the first time that I really felt different, I guess?

She spoke about how it had actually been the least offensive racist encounter she had ever had. She’s been in this country for ten years now, speaks English flawlessly (better than some native speakers) but still experiences racism. From having people move away from her on public transport to being told to ‘go back to her own country,’ these encounters aren’t uncommon.

We spoke about what skin colour really is. Just the difference in melanin is what creates different skin tones. She finds it ironic and laughable that some people wish for alien contact but can’t get along with their own species.

But on the other side, I stand. I walk around like I’m in a bubble. Because I see racism but it doesn’t affect me. I’ve never felt like an outsider due to my skin colour. I’ve never had racial slurs hurled at me. I only see racism when I look because it isn’t something I encounter daily.

My Dad and I had a conversation recently regarding racism. Honestly, they’re the only real conversations we have. Usually we just mumble occasional words to each other when needed. But the times we actually do have a proper conversation, albeit they are few and far between, one of us always leaves irritated and exasperated.

We had just watched a scene from EastEnders, one in which a white woman was telling an Indian man to ‘go back to his own country,’ even though he had been raised in England and held British citizenship.

I scoffed at the scene, rolling my eyes as I put my headphones in. I forgot about it until later when I had to recount the episode to my Mum. Whilst explaining the scene, my Dad decided to contribute his opinion by stating ‘well they’re stealing our jobs, aren’t they?!’

Cue the pregnant pause.

I heard my Mum sigh a small ‘oh god’ before leaving the room. I don’t blame her, she knew what would happen. It’s like how rats know to flee a sinking ship, it’s the same with Mums. They know when something’s brewing.

I turn to my white, middle aged, working class Father as he returns my gaze expectantly. ‘When has an immigrant ever stolen your job?’

My Dad is a self-employed car cleaner. Been traveling the exciting streets of Kent since 2000.

He responded with the common ‘Romanians and Ghanaians are stealing my customers!’

Whilst I was expecting that response, I wasn’t expecting it to be that specific. I, of course, was quick was point out that this was mainly to do with price and convenience. It’s a lot easier to drive into a car wash and pay £10 than it is to ring up, book an appointment for a months’ time and pay £40.

I then proceeded to point out that most immigrants that worked in Car Washes are victims of exploitation. They are promised a new life abroad which will benefit them and their families but instead, they are conned out of all their money, forced to work for less than peanuts and live in cramped, dire and very illegal conditions.

Just for fun, I decided to add that a majority of doctors, scientists, surgeons and NHS workers in general are foreign. Without them, healthcare would be non-existent.

This continued for another minute or so before my Father said the dread words.

‘Well, all Muslims are terrorists!’

Now, I will be the first to admit that I can be quite a confrontational person. If an issue needs addressing that no one else wishes to talk about, I will. And if I believe someone is morally wrong, I will voice that. I respect people’s opinions until their opinions disrespect other people’s existence.

But this was something else. I didn’t shout. I didn’t scream in disgust. I just basked in my own disgust and genuine amazement that someone could feel that way before I left the room.

I was so caught up in my thoughts that, at first, I didn’t hear him say ‘Lauren I’m joking!’

I just smiled in utter disbelief before turning to him, my voice barely above a whisper and said ‘Tell that to the families in Saudi Arabia and Pakistan that have just lost their children to terrorists.’

With that, I went to bed.

To be honest, I don’t think I’ll ever change my Dads mind. And that used to really bother me. It used to break my heart and sometimes it still does. But I know that if I ever have children, I was raise them to accept and respect everyone regardless of factors such as race, religion, sexuality or gender.

I don’t know how I turned out so differently from my Dad. Because I believe that one thing that we all have in common is what lies beneath. Underneath our blemished skin lies a beating heart, a powerful mind and blood than runs through our veins, keeping us alive. Regardless of our colour, we all bleed the same.

To me, we aren’t born to be prejudice. We don’t arrive in this world and immediately curl our nose up at the foreign doctor. No, prejudice is taught. It is projected onto us as vulnerable children when we are still discovering the world around them. Our still growing minds are tainted with hatred by those who are supposed to love us.

Race doesn’t matter when you’re six feet under.

Race doesn’t matter when all that’s left of you is bones.

Animal Story (Alternate Ver) (Celia)

Once upon a time, deep in the jungles of Bangladesh…

Lived a streak of tigers.

 

They spent their days running around and playing in the river.

That was until, one day, a new tiger showed up.

His name was Tali and he was different from the other tigers.

He had different coloured fur.

And the other tigers didn’t like that.

They called him names and pushed him around.

They treated him as if he was nothing.

This made Tali sad

Why did they treat him so badly, just    because he looked different?

Tali left the other tigers and walked away, his heart broken.

A few days later, when the Tigers were playing down by the river, Rahana fell into the water. He struggled against the current as the other tigers tried to pull him out.

But he couldn’t swim.

Neither could the other tigers.

As Rahana cried for help, the tigers were panicking.

With the water up to his eyes, hope was lost.

That was until a Tali shot through the branches and into the water. The streak watched on as Tali swam to the drowning Rahana. Pulling the soaking tiger onto his back, Tali swam back to shore.

The two were met by the streak as recovered.

“Are you okay?!”

“What happened?!”

The two were swarmed with questions.

“I’m fine.” Rahana said before turning to face Tali.

“You saved me. Thank you. But why? After how I treated you?”

“Because you were in trouble, I couldn’t just leave you.”

Rahana was shocked by his answer and began to felt extremely guilty for how he has treated the other tiger. The other tigers all bowed their heads in shame. They were embarrassed.

“We’re really sorry.” Said one tiger.

“We were so awful to you!”

“We judged you because of the colour of your fur and that wasn’t right. We’re so sorry.” Rahana said.

“Really?” Said Tali quietly.

“Really. We are really sorry!” Spoke up another Tiger.

 

 

Tali forgave the other tigers and they all became best friends. They spent their days       talking, joking and playing.

Evaluation (Celia)

Evaluation

 

For this trimester, our task was to create an educational piece aimed at children. I planned to create a story book for children aged 4 to 6 on the topic of racism. I spent several months gathering research, writing the story and creating the illustrations. We also conducted pre-production research.

 

 

What skills have I learnt through this project?

Through this project, I have gained several different types of skills. We used new programs to illustrate and create our projects such as Adobe Illustrator and InDesign. Through this project, I have gained knowledge on these programs and I now know how to operate them efficiently. This will help in my future pieces of work.

I have also expanded on my creative writing skills as I explored the form of Children’s books. Writing for children is unlike anything I’ve done before as I had to really change my writing style. Although it was challenging, I believe that I have now picked it up as a new skill for me to work on more.

The skills I have learnt through this project will be incredibly beneficial to me in the future. I now have new mediums to explore and from that, new stories to tell.

 

 

What is the purpose of this skill set?

This skillset was crucial to my project as a majority of the features of my work were created using this new skill set. The skills that I have learnt will benefit me as a creative and will help me in the future in my career.

We were taught this skillset to give us the tools needed to create a booklet for this project. The use of Adobe Illustrator, InDesign and Photoshop have been big factors in my work and have helped me bring my ideas to life. If I wanted to pursue a career in the Art & Design sector of media, this skill set will greatly benefit me.

 

 

 

Give at least, 3 examples of the skills being used in industry?

Many forms of media use programs such as Adobe Illustrator, Photoshop and InDesign to create flat graphics. Flat graphics are used in picture books, graphic novels, adverts and logos.

Graphic designers and illustrators frequently use these programs for their work and can be often seen in picture books or illustrations.

 

Did you run into any problems?

I ran into one major problem throughout the process of creating this project. One being that the Computers I used kept crashing when I tried to save my work on any Adobe Program. This severely impacted my work as I had to constantly recreate my illustrations. I overcame this problem by using different computers and working from home to create my illustrations.

 

What were my strengths?

I believe that in this project, my strengths were my time management skills and the fact that I adapt quickly to learn new skills. As we learnt a lot of new skills with several different programs, I had to learn quickly and keep it in my mind. I also worked hard to have my booklet done ahead of the deadline and write about the skills I had learnt each week on my blog.

 

What were my weaknesses?

In this project, I believe that my weaknesses were my illustrations. Art isn’t my strongest skill and I found illustrating to be the hardest part. Another factor was the programs I used. Whilst I picked up the skills quickly, I wasn’t entirely familiar with the software as I had only recently been introduced to it. I feel that my lack of experience with these programs affected my work.

 

 

 

What would I do differently?

If I were to do this project again or make another storybook, I would definitely invest more time into becoming more familiar with the programs so that I would be able to create higher quality illustrations and images.

I would also write a longer, more original and detailed story. Whilst I am happy with the story I wrote, I would like to be able to explore different styles of children’s stories, not just picture books.

I did make a major change in my work, when compared to my original storyboard. As you can see in the screenshots below, which are in my original booklet, I changed them as I felt they looked too similar. When considering my target audience, I decided that this layout with the illustrations would quickly lose the interest in the book. From that, I decided to change my booklet to make it more colorful and different.

I feel that my booklet is a lot better this way as it will appeal more to children and will grab their attention.

Finished Booklet (Celia)

Finished animal book 2

Memoir Draft (Greg)

I remember the first time I encountered racism.

I was on a school trip to the Dover Museum and my class ran into some kids from another school. It was common knowledge that if you saw kids from another school, you had to establish dominance. It began with glares but quickly escalated when the teacher’s backs were turned. I was looking at the toys in the gift shop when I first heard the ‘n-word.’ Being only nine at the time and rather naïve to the world around me, I looked over at my classmates. But I knew it was bad word by the silence that quickly engulfed my classmates, all of them looking to our friend Tatenda who had moved to England from Kenya the previous year. A few of the kids from the other school looked quite taken aback whilst the rest looked just as confused as me. With tear filled eyes, Tatenda quickly turned her back to them and ran to the loos. It was the first time I had ever seen her not smiling. Whilst she was still getting a grasp on the English language, she seemed to understand that word. Even though I didn’t. She didn’t smile for the rest of the day.

I saw her at Christmas when she came home from University for the holidays. She’s 19 now, studying to become a lawyer. She was already nursing her second mug of black coffee the morning I saw her. I need it for finals, she had said with a tired smile.

When I told her I was writing this piece, I asked if she remembered that day in Dover. She nodded, shocked that I remembered. It was the first time that I really felt different, I guess?

She spoke about how it had actually been the least offensive racist encounter she had ever had. She’s been in this country for ten years now, speaks English flawlessly (better than some native speakers) but still experiences racism. From having people move away from her on public transport to being told to ‘go back to her own country,’ these encounters aren’t uncommon.

We spoke about what skin colour really is. Just the difference in melanin is what creates different skin tones. She finds it ironic and laughable that some people wish for alien contact but can’t get along with their own species.

But on the other side, I stand. I walk around like I’m in a bubble. Because I see racism but it doesn’t affect me. I’ve never felt like an outsider due to my skin colour. I’ve never had racial slurs hurled at me. I only see racism when I look because it isn’t something I encounter daily.

One thing that we all have in common is what lies beneath. Underneath our blemished skin lies a beating heart, a powerful mind and blood than runs through our veins, keeping us alive. Regardless of our colour, we all bleed the same.

To me, we aren’t born to be prejudice. We don’t arrive in this world and immediately curl our nose up at the foreign doctor. No, prejudice is taught. It is projected onto us as vulnerable children when we are still discovering the world around them. Our still growing minds are tainted with hatred by those who are supposed to love us.

Race doesn’t matter when you’re six feet under.

Race doesn’t matter when all that’s left of you is bones.

Finished Article (Updated)

What makes a foreigner?

Lauren Reeves

 

 

Let me tell you a story about a man who moved to England from a foreign country. He experienced discrimination at first but it was soon stopped as the perpetrators realised what they were doing was wrong. They all lived happily ever after. The end.

But this isn’t a fairy-tale. There is no happy ending to this story.

This is the story of one of the most infamous cases of discrimination in the UK, that of Bijan Ebrahimi, a quiet Iranian refugee with learning difficulties and physical impairment. The man loved his garden and his tabby cat yet was subjected to years of racial abuse which ultimately led to his murder. Between 2007 and 2013, 85 phone calls were made by Ebrahimi to the police, 73 of which were reporting racial abuse, criminal damage and threats to kill. However, said police didn’t record these incidents on over 40 occasions.

Ebrahimi decided to take matters into his own hands by recording the abuse he suffered using his mobile phone. However, during one incident, a local resident misinterpreted his actions as a man trying to take photos of his daughter. He notified the police and when they arrived, they were greeted with the sight of a blood thirsty mob surrounding Ebrahimi’s house, the loud shouts of ‘paedophile’ echoing down the street. Police arrested Ebrahimi for ‘breach of the peace’ and the crowd cheered. He was released without charge the following day but rumours continued to circulate and the residents’ of Brislington’s pitchforks were sharpened.

In July of 2013, Bijan Ebrahimi was beaten unconscious by Stephen Norley and Lee James, the latter being the same man who accused him of being a paedophile, and then set alight as others looked on. Bijan Ebrahimi was dead.

In the aftermath of this horrific crime, Norley and Lee were jailed for life and several officers were sacked after discriminating against Ebrahimi and regarding him as a ‘nuisance’ in their reports.

Now, almost 4 years later, have we learnt anything? Apparently not.

In 2016, there were over 80,000 hate crimes in the UK with 78% of these attacks being race related. This is huge jump from the previous year that saw just over 62,000 hate crimes. These numbers are a result of broken Britain.

When humans feel that they are under extreme threat, they can often resort to basic yet animalistic instincts. With immigration numbers doubling since 2013, those who feel threatened can revert to the ‘us vs them’ mindset. Therefore, if you are deemed ‘different,’ most commonly a ‘foreigner,’ then they will see you as against them.

But what makes someone a ‘foreigner?’

Is it down to skin colour? Or where you were born? Is there a specific amount of days you must live in this country before you are considered ‘British?’

According to our recent online survey that was conducted in December, most Brits agree that a foreigner is someone who emigrates to a country they weren’t born in. Yet, if that was the case, why are black Britons targeted? Why was Stephen Lawrence, a British born Black teenager murdered? Why are second or third generation immigrants on the receiving end of hatred?

A 2007 citizenship survey on first generation immigrants concluded that 89% of both Indian and Pakistani, 87% of Bangladeshi and 84% of both black African and black Caribbean said that they identified as British.

With numbers like that, you’d think that discrimination against immigrants would be a lot less common considering they consider themselves as British. Yet ‘Britain First’ still exists, with a German born leader mind you.

But if we continue to divide ourselves due to country of birth or skin colour, we will be no more than animals. However, with Brexit proceeding, the worst may be yet to come.

Immigration plays a big part in any society. America is America through immigration. If the British hadn’t had invaded then the Native Americans would still own the land. But now, it is home to gun violence, racism and Donald Trump.

Whilst we don’t have a trigger-happy, baby handed leader, we do have Brexit. With the two nations currently undergoing major changes in their leadership, racially motivated hate crimes have increased by a third through the financial year of 2016 to 2017.

But God save the Queen, right?

Finished Article (Greg)

What makes a foreigner?

Lauren Reeves

 

 

Immigration plays a big part in any society. America is America through immigration. If the British hadn’t had invaded then the Native Americans would still own the land. But now, it is home to gun violence and racism. Although, we aren’t much better.

Let me tell you a story about a man who moved to England from a foreign country. He experienced discrimination at first but it was soon stopped as the perpetrators realised what they were doing was wrong. They all lived happily ever after. The end.

But this isn’t a fairy-tale. There is no happy ending to this story.

This is the story of one of the most infamous cases of discrimination in the UK, that of Bijan Ebrahimi, a quiet Iranian refugee with learning difficulties and physical impairment. The man loved his garden and his tabby cat yet was subjected to years of racial abuse which ultimately led to his murder. Between 2007 and 2013, 85 phone calls were made by Ebrahimi to the police, 73 of which were reporting racial abuse, criminal damage and threats to kill. However, said police didn’t record these incidents on over 40 occasions.

Ebrahimi decided to take matters into his own hands by recording the abuse he suffered using his mobile phone. However, during one incident, a local resident misinterpreted these actions as him trying to take photos of his daughter. He notified the police and when they arrived, they were greeted with the sight of a blood thirsty mob surrounding Ebrahimi’s house, the loud shouts of ‘paedophile’ echoing down the street. Police arrested Ebrahimi for ‘breach of the peace’ and the crowd cheered. He was released without charge the following day but rumours continued to circulate and the residents’ of Brislingtons pitchforks were sharpened. They were now on a witch hunt.

In July of 2013, Bijan Ebrahimi was beaten unconscious by Stephen Norley and Lee James, the latter being the same man who accused him of being a paedophile, and then set alight as others looked on. Bijan Ebrahimi was dead.

In the aftermath of this horrific crime, Norley and Lee were jailed for life and several officers were sacked after showing ‘racial bias’ and regarding Ebrahimi as a ‘nuisance’ in their reports.

Now, almost 4 years later, have we learnt anything? Apparently not.

In 2016, there were over 80,000 hate crimes in the UK with 78% of these attacks being race related. This is huge jump from the previous year that saw just over 62,000 hate crimes. These numbers are a result of broken Britain.

When humans feel that they are under extreme threat, they can often resort to basic yet animalistic instincts. With immigration numbers skyrocketing, those who feel threatened can revert to the ‘us vs them’ mindset. Therefore, if you are deemed ‘different’ by these people, most commonly a ‘foreigner,’ then they will see you as against them.

But what makes someone a ‘foreigner?’

Is it down to skin colour? Or where you were born? Is there a specific amount of days you must live in this country before you are considered ‘British?’

According to our recent survey, most Brits agree that a foreigner is someone who immigrates to a country they weren’t born in. Yet, if that was the case, why are black Britons targeted? Why was Stephen Lawrence, a British born Black teenager murdered? Why are second or third generation immigrants on the receiving end of hatred?

A 2007 citizenship survey on first generation immigrants concluded that 89% of both Indian and Pakistani, 87% of Bangladeshi and 84% of both black African and black Caribbean said that they identified as British.

With numbers like that, you’d think that discrimination against immigrants would be a lot less common considering they consider themselves as British. Yet ‘Britain First’ still exists, with a German born leader mind you. Because go figure.

But if we continue to divide ourselves due to country of birth or skin colour, we will be no more than animals. However, with Brexit proceeding, the worst may be yet to come.

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